Keeps Me Out Of Trouble

A new client dropped off his 1972 BMW R75/5 Toaster for a rebuild. He wanted something similar to "Frein", the 72' Red Toaster I built and sold almost two years ago. I miss that red bike, should of kept it, but money comes and goes, and the bikes often alleviate the situation. The clients toaster was purchased out in Riverside, CA. From the tags, the toasters been sitting since 2001. Speedometer needles are gone, the toaster panels only has a few minor dents, the tank lining is good, but other than that the toaster looked like a daily rider with a later /6 seat. Battery acid destroyed the areas around the battery tray and swing-arm. I'll try to get this bike started first and feel her out.

I spent about five hours on the 1978 R100S this afternoon. Going through the rear-end torquing everything down to spec. Of course I lost focus for a half an hour and I started cleaning the snowflake wheels and shinning the rear rubbers up. I took the rear-sets off the R90S and installed it on the R100S, since the goal is to start the R100S within the next week. New rear-sets are currently getting machined. The ceramic coated Hoske's were a rear bitch to install, just imagine trying not to scratch the matte black ceramic coating, yeah a real bitch. The R100S have already been timed, the oil pressures good, the next step is to set the front-end up. I feel like I've done twice the amount of work on the R100S. When I spend too much time on a motorcycle, it usually means it wants to stay here with me. Maybe I have too many projects going on... but this keeps me out of trouble... I think...

Tear Down

My neighbors were kind enough to watch Ursula while she played action figures with their son. This gave me about an hour to tear down the eyesores that came with the 1959 BMW R60.

A few years ago, I decided to purchase a pair of reproduction Hoske clip-ons, saving it for the day when I get my hands on a /2. There were times when I considered selling the clip-ons, telling myself I'll probably stick with Airheads forever, nothing is forever, so I'm glad I didn't sell it. The Hoske's completely changes the aesthetics of the /2, I'm beginning to like the small tank accented with these clip-ons.

The night I brought the R60 home, after putting Ursula to sleep, I started taking off that big fairing, I'm not sure if its a Wixom or Flanders fairing, but it'll be used as wall-art in my studio. I then removed the leather bags... The task took about an hour, that's because the previous owner used SAE bolt sizes, mixed an matched all over, and it drove me insane for the full hour.

This afternoon I removed the solo Harley Seat and again it was a challenge due to the mix & matched SAE bolts used. The rear fender had to be removed to get the seat off. A beat up Scorsch Meier dual seat came with the purchase, I mocked it up and didn't like the proportion to the smaller tank. I think with the smaller tank, the single Pagusa/Denfeld streamlines better with the look I want. The only thing salvageable from the dual seat are the mounting hardwares.

I'm still thinking about what I should do with the bike. After cleaning off the filth and grime on a small section of the gearbox case, a nice patina revealed itself. First thing is to get this R60 started, then take the top-end apart, take the engine/gearbox out, and powder-coat the frame... I don't know what color yet.

Desert Rat

A 1959 BMW R60 (/2) found me via email when a friend gave a lead. The bike was located out in the high desert, the owner was the second owner of the bike and had it since the early 1970's. Its very rare to get a good deal on a /2 BMW nowadays, but if and when the opportunity arises, find money and buy it. This 59 /2 has had a lot of history, its traveled across the country at least three times and up to Canada a few times too and the motors never been apart. My reason for the purchase is to get familiar with these twins, but I haven't decided what I was going to do with this bike yet. I was thinking along the lines of a brat and a cafe clone, maybe using a Honda CB tank with a GSXR front-end and I'm totally kidding.

Apprentice

The top end is back together on the 1978 R100S. This Beagle, named Chubby is my new apprentice. She watches and never says a word. I find myself trusting her, on the plus side, she never tells me she wants to "pick my brain."

I wanted to mess around with the 1973 R75S build so Chubby followed me back into the Studio. I had the kick-starter lightly polished so I thought it would be easier to install it on the the gearbox if I just took it out of the frame.

Friends often ask me why I don't have an apprentice or intern. Here are a few reasons;
1. My home is my sanctuary.
2. My 4 year old daughter lives here.
3. I think 1 & 2 are good enough reasons.

PCH Bound

My daughter Ursula just had her fourth birthday party. It was a small party, I hired a actress to dress up and sing like Elsa The Snow Queen, it was totally worth it. After the party, the house felt empty again, Ursula developed a fever and went home with her mother. I just felt the urge to go... and go fast.

I took the R90S out on a familiar path, down to Pacific Coast Highway via Brookhurst St. in Huntington Beach and rode up the pedestrian pathway close to the sandy shore. Enjoyed the sunset for a few minutes and I took off towards Fashion Island, Newport Beach. Splitting lanes and shaking my head at douche-bags with their Maserati's and Porsche's as they rev their engine as if I was really going to race those numb-skulls. Made a left on MacArthur towards the 73 fwy and the engine smoothed out to the point I thought the engine might have died. It was good to get whatever it was out of my system.

Repeat

The 1978 BMW R100S is almost reassembled again after the whole missing oil passage hole dilemma that the BMW factory tech forgot to drill. After storing the R100S paint work away in the closet for months, the tank needed light color sanding and the interior of the fairing needed to be sprayed in flat black. For some reason the painter thought the interior of the fairing was not visible when on the bike, easy fix. It's also time to paint the front and rear fenders on the 1973 R75S build, brought the painter my ready to go black toaster tank for reference. Almost there...

1978 BMW R100S Engine - Reassembled

Spent a few hours reassembling the short block after dealing with the missing oil passage hole issue on the left cylinder side. Since I have the engine apart, I might as well show what's in it. The only other noteworthy parts I left out and not pictured here are the 320 degree mid-range sports camshaft and titanium valve retainers / dual valve springs.

The top-end cylinder jugs and heads are powder-coated. Venturi intake spigots are fitted to the heads for the Dellorto conversion. Custom modern pistons are used.

The top-end cylinder jugs and heads are powder-coated. Venturi intake spigots are fitted to the heads for the Dellorto conversion. Custom modern pistons are used.

A Enduralast 450w Charging System will be used for the build. Available in my store - Link

A Enduralast 450w Charging System will be used for the build. Available in my store - Link

Instead of a machined lightweight flywheel for pre-1981 airheads, I retrofitted a 81-84 flywheel and clutch assembly. To do this the gearbox will have to be retrofitted too with 81 on parts.

Instead of a machined lightweight flywheel for pre-1981 airheads, I retrofitted a 81-84 flywheel and clutch assembly. To do this the gearbox will have to be retrofitted too with 81 on parts.

A aftermarket lightweight starter weighing 7 pounds with 70% more output than the old Bosch starter. If interested please contact me, I'll have this on my webstore soon.

A aftermarket lightweight starter weighing 7 pounds with 70% more output than the old Bosch starter. If interested please contact me, I'll have this on my webstore soon.

I should of taken a picture before installing the rods. I had the connecting rods lightened, see how much material was taken off compared to the old rods.

I should of taken a picture before installing the rods. I had the connecting rods lightened, see how much material was taken off compared to the old rods.

You can see where more of the material on the lightened rods were taken off around the journal and bolt area.

You can see where more of the material on the lightened rods were taken off around the journal and bolt area.

1978 BMW R100S Engine - Disassembled

Last week while running a standard oil pressure check before igniting the engine, I noticed the left cylinder intake rocker arm had no oil running out. After many attempts and waiting a day to turn the engine, oil was still not seeping through. Working backwards, I took the top end apart thinking that something was blocking the oil passage hole above the engine stud rod. I was astonished to find a factory punch mark for the oil passage hole, but there was no hole. Basically, the technician at the BMW plant, back in 1977 forgot to drill this oil passage hole. After a few sleepless nights, wondering what else this German tech from 1977 forgot to do on this block, I decided to disassemble the engine and check every single oil passage hole.

The oil passage hole I drilled is in picture number three. I took a 2 mm drill bit and slowly drilled through the aluminum until it met the passage behind it. After further investigation of the engine block, everything looks like where it was supposed to be. This cost me a new chain, few rod bolts, and a lot of time, but its better than loosing sleep.

Costa Mesa, CA

Thirty-two years of my life have been spent in Orange County and in the last ten years I've resided in the South Coast Metro / Costa Mesa area. This is my favorite place to live in the world right now. The weather is spectacular, riding season is nearly continuous, and the beach is only a four mile ride away via the river trail. Orange County may be a melting pot, it may not have architectural culture, but it does have trend setting influences.

A few days ago I met up with my friend Curtis for lunch at The Camp and rode to Period Correct, a space curating vintage Porches and race cars along with their own collection of vintage race inspired clothing. A brilliant space to visit for any automotive enthusiast and a space where I often gasp after exiting... if only I had a space like this for my beemers... #goals...

And it seems to be a ritual, we ended up at Portola Coffee at The Soco Collection to end the short afternoon ride.

VIP Parking

VIP Parking

Martini Lancia

Martini Lancia

Being colorblind, I asked Curtis what color this Porsche was... he said he didn't know...

Being colorblind, I asked Curtis what color this Porsche was... he said he didn't know...

30 years apart - 2006 Ducati Paul Smart Limited Edition & 1976 BMW R90S Ritmo Sereno Traditional Custom

30 years apart - 2006 Ducati Paul Smart Limited Edition & 1976 BMW R90S Ritmo Sereno Traditional Custom

Studio

Your space is an outward reflection of your inner-self. It was long overdue for me to move forward and get myself mentally together. For more then a year, I've neglected my inner-space, and the end result of the six hours spent re-arranging the studio came with clarity.

Mark's Place

At 70+ years old, my mentor Mark Spitler is still re-building and selling airheads. Over the years as I progressed into other areas on the airhead, Mark now brings me all his gearboxes for me to go through. Its great practice and fun to see the MacGyver-ish things previous owners have done to their gearboxes.

Mark's "Mule", he calls it his work bike. You'll often see him cruising the 405 freeway with tires, gearboxes or any other airhead parts loaded on the back of this R80. I'm rebuilding the gearbox off this bike for him.

Mark's "Mule", he calls it his work bike. You'll often see him cruising the 405 freeway with tires, gearboxes or any other airhead parts loaded on the back of this R80. I'm rebuilding the gearbox off this bike for him.

A R90S he's currently building for a customer out in the East. The gearbox was rebuilt by yours truly.

A R90S he's currently building for a customer out in the East. The gearbox was rebuilt by yours truly.

Mark's first airhead under the cover, he calls it "Joe Black". It started as a R90S, but its been converted too many times with hot parts. Another one of his personal favorites is his 1976 R75/6.

Mark's first airhead under the cover, he calls it "Joe Black". It started as a R90S, but its been converted too many times with hot parts. Another one of his personal favorites is his 1976 R75/6.

Back To The Garage

I avoid going to the garage to work on projects. For me it looses the romantic connection with the motorcycle. The motorcycle should be built in privacy and the garage should be used for maintenance of the vehicle. Unless if I lived on the cliffs of Laguna Beach over looking the Pacific in a mid-century modern home, I wouldn't complain then.

Ritmo Sereno sister bikes. Ritmo is known for their mono-shock airhead conversions. These two are obviously dual-shock airheads. What's the difference? The main difference is that mono-shock wiring is all hidden under the tank and dual-shock wiring is all in the headlight bucket. So to convert a dual-shock with a Ritmo fairing, the builder will have to re-route all the wiring to underneath the tank or elsewhere on the motorcycle.

Ritmo Sereno sister bikes. Ritmo is known for their mono-shock airhead conversions. These two are obviously dual-shock airheads. What's the difference? The main difference is that mono-shock wiring is all hidden under the tank and dual-shock wiring is all in the headlight bucket. So to convert a dual-shock with a Ritmo fairing, the builder will have to re-route all the wiring to underneath the tank or elsewhere on the motorcycle.

Working in the garage has its perks. I can watch Ursula be active outside riding her scooter in the cul-de-sac. This babe always brings me little flowers.

Working in the garage has its perks. I can watch Ursula be active outside riding her scooter in the cul-de-sac. This babe always brings me little flowers.

The Bavarian Clan...

The Bavarian Clan...

Nightlife

The bulk of the time in my projects are allocated to prep work. The errands seems endless in the beginning phase. I'm in the car more than I'm in the studio. Sometimes, I have to use up my nightlife to compensate for lost time.

The rear-set brackets I developed with a friend was a success. These mount on directly to dual-shock airhead frames. Universal Tarrozzi or any other similar rear-sets will be able to be mounted on. I'm trying to find a more cost effective way to get these made.

The rear-set brackets I developed with a friend was a success. These mount on directly to dual-shock airhead frames. Universal Tarrozzi or any other similar rear-sets will be able to be mounted on. I'm trying to find a more cost effective way to get these made.

The CA Tuned R100 motor and gearbox are finally gutted out. I've already received a quote from a powder-coating company that specializes in coating motors. A lot of prep work will be handled by these guys. I look forward to see how these will come back.

The CA Tuned R100 motor and gearbox are finally gutted out. I've already received a quote from a powder-coating company that specializes in coating motors. A lot of prep work will be handled by these guys. I look forward to see how these will come back.

BMW (Airheads 1974-1995) Shifting Cam Metal Roll Pin Upgrade

A simple and inexpensive upgrade for smoother shifting is by changing the old white plastic roll pin for a metal BMW K-Series roll pin. It's good practice to change all the return springs at the same time. See below for part numbers. 

Here are the part numbers for the roll pin and springs; Metal Roll Pin: 23 31 1 451 087 Roll Pin Cir-clip: 07 11 9 934 034 Gear Change Spring: 23 31 1 231 618 Shank Spring: 23 31 1 242 910 Gear Chang Spring: 23 31 1 234 791

Here are the part numbers for the roll pin and springs;

Metal Roll Pin: 23 31 1 451 087
Roll Pin Cir-clip: 07 11 9 934 034
Gear Change Spring: 23 31 1 231 618
Shank Spring: 23 31 1 242 910
Gear Chang Spring: 23 31 1 234 791

By now you should know to take photos when taking things apart. I always leave the gears in first gear when disassembling, see picture. During assembly make sure it looks like the picture above (first gear)... or you'll have a hell of a time...

By now you should know to take photos when taking things apart. I always leave the gears in first gear when disassembling, see picture. During assembly make sure it looks like the picture above (first gear)... or you'll have a hell of a time...

The roll pin is currently in first gear.

The roll pin is currently in first gear.

This is what the new K-Bike metal roll pin looks like along with a new (1975 on) gear change return spring.

This is what the new K-Bike metal roll pin looks like along with a new (1975 on) gear change return spring.

Both new gear change return spring and shank spring installed.

Both new gear change return spring and shank spring installed.

Mock-Up

A quick mock up in the living room before she moves into the garage. Wiring is finally done and I'm not satisfied with it, I already know what I'll do differently next time.

Last Sundown

This may be every man's dream to work on his motorcycle in the living room. Honestly, it gets real old real quick. The living room is a place to relax, and I can't relax if I'm constantly staring at the motorcycle. Plus, it's a hassle to clean. When summer comes along, I'll be installing a AC unit in the studio to keep me from doing this again.

Le Pacte Des Loups

New Years Day 2016, received a text message from another guy taking advantage of the open road. His girlfriend made dinner while we sipped on whiskey and I admired his Louis Vuitton poster by Razzia. Good start to the New Year.

IMG_9697.jpg

CA Tuned Project Underway

The CA Tuned project bike will be a collaboration between; Bavarian Cafe, The Mighty Motor and Oni Motorworks. The core of this BMW is a 1986 R80 Monolever. I am excited to work with these talented individuals, professionals in their field of design, fabrication, and restoration. This 30 year old bike will be revived with a new image, can't wait for all of you to see it come to fruition on my website. Here's to 2016!

1976 R90S Gearbox Rebuild - Drive Shaft Replacement

I'm currently rebuilding a 1976 BMW R90S gearbox for a customer. The original splines on the drive shaft (left side in picture) still has some life, but the customer wanted it replaced since his R90S is being restored. The drive shaft is still available from BMW, although with a hefty price tag. These 18mm drive shafts were used in airhead models from 1974 (/6 models) to 1980 (/7 models). I've replaced quite a few of these on restored bikes, it's time consuming, but I've learned a few tricks along the way.

From 1974 (/6 models) to 1980 (/7 models), this 18mm driveshaft was used in all airhead gearboxes. The left one is from the 1976 R90S gearbox and the right one is new.

From 1974 (/6 models) to 1980 (/7 models), this 18mm driveshaft was used in all airhead gearboxes. The left one is from the 1976 R90S gearbox and the right one is new.

When purchasing or rebuilding a used gearbox, the splines should be the first thing to check. New splines have an almost flat surface on the tip while old splines are sharp. My recommendation to the customer would be to re-use the old shaft if the bike is only a weekend rider around town and a brand new shaft if the bike will be seeing a lot of the road. Keep in mind at this point, the gearbox is gutted, so one should weigh the benefit of saving on labor now.

When purchasing or rebuilding a used gearbox, the splines should be the first thing to check. New splines have an almost flat surface on the tip while old splines are sharp. My recommendation to the customer would be to re-use the old shaft if the bike is only a weekend rider around town and a brand new shaft if the bike will be seeing a lot of the road. Keep in mind at this point, the gearbox is gutted, so one should weigh the benefit of saving on labor now.

After the groove bearing and bush is removed, there is a snap ring that requires compression to access, it's difficult. In the Clymers manual, they suggest using a steel pipe with a cutout window and a 12 ton press. I followed the Clymers method for sometime, but it was challenging. Here I'm using a cheap bearing puller from Harbor Freight, it compresses the shaft. This eliminates the press and steel pipe method. But regardless you should still have a 12-ton press for bearing jobs.

After the groove bearing and bush is removed, there is a snap ring that requires compression to access, it's difficult. In the Clymers manual, they suggest using a steel pipe with a cutout window and a 12 ton press. I followed the Clymers method for sometime, but it was challenging. Here I'm using a cheap bearing puller from Harbor Freight, it compresses the shaft. This eliminates the press and steel pipe method. But regardless you should still have a 12-ton press for bearing jobs.

Compressed and the snap ring is exposed. It's still a challenge sometimes to get that ring out. 

Compressed and the snap ring is exposed. It's still a challenge sometimes to get that ring out. 

After the snap ring is out, the shaft can be completely disassembled. The new parts include; drive shaft, Japanese made groove bearing, bearing cover plate, and cylindrical roller bearing.

After the snap ring is out, the shaft can be completely disassembled. The new parts include; drive shaft, Japanese made groove bearing, bearing cover plate, and cylindrical roller bearing.

Here is the completed drive shaft. 

Here is the completed drive shaft. 

AFTERNOON

Between 3 & 4 PM the best natural light would rest right here. Seeing this usually reminds me that I should complete this R100S project. I've been feeling the urge to start on new projects again. I found myself on ebay last night... not a good idea...